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Employment at will (EAW) is a concept that did not exist at one time in America’s past. In 1877, Horace G. Wood articulated the doctrine in A Treatise on the Law of Master and Servant. The concept of EAW must be placed in historical perspective. In the post–Civil War era, the Industrial Revolution went into full swing, and with it came a strong demand for labor. Before that, labor demand was limited, and a national employment policy was practically nonexistent.
All employers, including oncology practices, face human resource (HR) management challenges. For most medical practices, complying with the federal Department of Labor (DOL) Wage and Hour Division standards or with the minimum wage state laws, and any local ordinances, is especially important, because managers in medical practices may be so focused on caregiving that they lose sight of issues such as the exempt status of employees, the use of interns and independent contractors, and how those HR decisions could affect the employer. In addition, it is possible that many medical practices do not have ready access to, and oversight by, a qualified HR professional, because of their size or their financial situation.
Recently retired and looking back over my decades in the workforce, I see gender issues once again gaining strength. I was raised to believe there were no gender barriers or limitations, and most of what I have seen in my youth and working years has supported that.
Recently retired and looking back over my decades in the workforce, I see gender issues once again gaining strength. I was raised to believe there were no gender barriers or limitations, and most of what I have seen in my youth and working years has supported that.
Recently retired and looking back over my decades in the workforce, I see gender issues once again gaining strength. I was raised to believe there were no gender barriers or limitations, and most of what I have seen in my youth and working years has supported that. Yet significant events stand in stark contrast, leaving an indelible mark in my mind and a subtle reminder of a different era.
A quick review of the evening news will often reveal stories of someone in an organization either doing wrong or blowing the whistle on someone else who did wrong. No organization is immune from having its reputation questioned when an employee or manager is caught violating ethical or legal standards, and the fallout can be damaging in many ways.
Aquick review of the evening news will often reveal stories of someone in an organization either doing wrong or blowing the whistle on someone else who did wrong. No organization is immune from having its reputation questioned when an employee or manager is caught violating ethical or legal standards, and the fallout can be damaging in many ways.
Aquick review of the evening news will often reveal stories of someone in an organization either doing wrong or blowing the whistle on someone else who did wrong. No organization is immune from having its reputation questioned when an employee or manager is caught violating ethical or legal standards, and the fallout can be damaging in many ways.

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  • American Health and Drug Benefits
  • Lynx CME
  • Value Based Care in Rheumatology
  • Oncology Practice Management
  • Urology Practice Management

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